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pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.
Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.
Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.

Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.

Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

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zerostatereflex:

Atomic Blast

zerostatereflex:

Atomic Blast

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space-pics:

A powerful view of the internationality of space exploration: Canadarm (CSA) and Atlantis (NASA) docked near the Columbus module (ESA) on the ISS [4288x2847]http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

space-pics:

A powerful view of the internationality of space exploration: Canadarm (CSA) and Atlantis (NASA) docked near the Columbus module (ESA) on the ISS [4288x2847]
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

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One thing I have learned in a long life: that all our science, measured against reality, is primitive and childlike—and yet it is the most precious thing we have.

Albert Einstein, letter to Hans Muehsam, 9 July 1951

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infinity-imagined:

A Dunkleosteus skull, photographed at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller Alberta.  Dunkleosteus was a placoderm fish that lived in the late Devonian, 380 to 360 million years ago.  It was a hypercarnivorous apex predator, feeding on armored prey such as ammonites, arthropods, and other placoderms.  Fully grown individuals had more than 700 kilograms of bite force, enough to easily shear through bone and protective tissues.  Members of the largest species could grow up to 10 meters in length and weigh almost four tonnes.

infinity-imagined:

A Dunkleosteus skull, photographed at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller Alberta.  Dunkleosteus was a placoderm fish that lived in the late Devonian, 380 to 360 million years ago.  It was a hypercarnivorous apex predator, feeding on armored prey such as ammonites, arthropods, and other placoderms.  Fully grown individuals had more than 700 kilograms of bite force, enough to easily shear through bone and protective tissues.  Members of the largest species could grow up to 10 meters in length and weigh almost four tonnes.

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eightninea:

Ventricle —

eightninea:

Ventricle —

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